Tag Archives: politics

I’ll Never Run for Office

By now you’ve probably heard of the accusations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. It has been alleged that he sexually assaulted a woman (Christine Ford) more than 35 years ago while in high school.

What makes this so frustrating is that no one in their right mind would want to belittle or scoff at any woman’s claim of being assaulted, yet the circumstances surrounding the release of this information is patently suspicious. The indignation shown by Kavanaugh’s political adversaries at the suggestion the release of the accusation at this particular time is nothing more than a political stunt is rather laughable – except it’s not at all funny.

It has become known that Dr. Christine Ford (the accuser) has been very active in promoting liberal causes and the political left. It is also obvious that what supposedly happened 35 years ago could have been brought to the attention of authorities at any time during Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s rising career, one that has had to endure six FBI background investigations (count them – SIX!) and multiple U.S. Senate confirmation hearings. But now that Kavanaugh is poised to become a key personality on the Supreme Court, coincidentally right before a potential shift in congressional control, an accusation of assault comes out.

So, yeah, I’m not the only one who is skeptical.

Judge Brett Kavanaugh shook President Trump’s hand, so he must be the worst person in the world. Obviously.

Which brings me to the point of my writing this morning: I’ll never run for office.

No, even though I’ve considered it in the past, I will never put my name in the hat for any political office – my closet has too many skeletons. Oh, don’t be too shocked. What kind of things did you do when you were young? Did you ever get into a schoolyard brawl? Did you and your sweetheart ever get into an argument? Did you ever get a speeding ticket? Did you ever get angry and accidentally hurt someone, even slightly?

If you did any of the above, then odds are – according to Left – you’re a lawbreaking abuser with an unpredictable temper unfit for public office. If you run for office, or if you’re nominated for any critical position in government, people from your past will come out of the woodwork to accuse you of things you don’t even remember, and that in itself will be a testament to the fact that you are cold and uncaring, blind to the wounds you cause others.

It was in first grade I threw a rock on the playground and hit a girl. It may or may not have been an accident, but I can’t remember. As punishment, I was called into the Superintendent’s office and made to apologize, then was told to give her a hug and a kiss to prove I was sorry. That was in 1972. Should I run for office, I’m sure that the story would come out that I assaulted a young girl and then participated in unwanted sexual advances. Even more, I would then be made to answer questions about why I did not report me being asked to sexually assault the young girl. I wouldn’t doubt that an investigation would be launched into the private school I attended, and any other related offenses would be linked to me because I had never publicly opposed them.

I was only 5 or 6 years old, but who cares? That’s politics. And I didn’t even tell you what happened when I was a teenager!

And that’s why I’ll never run for office.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under current events, politics

On Jost and Che: Thanking Jesus

The Emmys, etc.

I didn’t watch them.

I never do. I never watch any award shows.

I used to watch them – years ago – when they were actually funny and entertaining. Now they are nothing more than self-indulgent platforms for self-important people to slam normal people who actually make a difference in the world.

So, all I ever see from the modern awards shows, like the Emmy Awards, is what ends up on the news or viral YouTube clips.

I just don’t care.

The Jesus Joke

Then just this morning, all over the media news outlets, there came the clip from the Emmy Awards’ opening monologue from Colin Jost and Michael Che. Oh, it was hilarious! Not.

What made the news! Oh, nothing more than what has become the norm for those on the political and social left.

Michael Che (who is he, anyway?), a black man, joked that his mother wasn’t going to be watching the Emmys. Why? Because the winners on “white” award shows never thank Jesus for anything. He went on to say,

“The only white people that thank Jesus are Republicans and ex-crackheads.”

Photo: ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

Funny. Really funny. Absolutely brilliant, original, creative comedy. NOT.

It’s just so easy to insult Christians, and that’s nothing new. For that matter, this whole story is nothing new; it’s been this way for years, now. It’s just becoming so common that the shock factor has completely worn off and even the atheists are getting bored.

And what’s also getting old is pointing out the fact that no joke, ever, not on their life, would be offered in the same way about Muslims. Nope. Never.

Because, odds are, no Christian or Republican who thanks Jesus for anything will hunt you down or pose a real terroristic threat to your next black-tie venue. Christians…those sheep who go silently to slaughter. Those Republicans…who never fight fire with fire.

Thanking Jesus

For the record, I am a Republican. I also thank Jesus for everything. However, I’m not an ex-crackhead – because I’ve never used crack. I am a sinner redeemed by grace, however.

But those “ex-crackheads” who are thanking Jesus might be worth listening to. Better than the drug addicts on stage, I would suppose.

And to all you Democrats out there, who do you thank? Have all the Jesus-thankers left your party?

I know Christian Democrats (I don’t understand them, but I know them), and I believe – unless I’m been deceived – they give thanks to Jesus.

I also know a lot of Republicans who are heathen, so…

Again, this is why I don’t watch this stuff; it’s stupid, offensive, and certainly not funny.

Thank Jesus I had better things to do.

 

8 Comments

Filed under America, Christianity, politics

Preach Civility At the Very Least!

To be honest, I’ve had people tell me that I preach too much politics from the pulpit. Some of them have been members of churches where I pastored, and some of them have left to find other places to worship (presumably). But if you think I’m going to apologize at this point, you’re mistaken.

I have nothing to apologize for (not even for ending this sentence with a preposition – which I despise, by the way). Despite what the complainers may say, I don’t stand behind a pulpit and tell people whom to vote for or what party to which they should belong. When the subject needs to be addressed, or especially when it falls in line with a topic within an expositional study of Scripture, what I do is address the issue from a biblical position so that believers know what the Bible has to say. After all, if the Word of God is to be our rule and guide for life, shouldn’t it guide the way we act as citizens?

During the last presidential election cycle I never once told anyone to vote against Hillary Clinton and for another candidate. However, I did not hide what I believed would happen, specifically to the churches of America, should Hillary Clinton be elected president, and I based that entirely on her statements and precedent set by the past administration. But at the same time (and I have the recording to prove it), when preaching through the book of Acts, I came to the passage where Paul dealt with an oracle that had a “pythian spirit” and warned against the dangers of electing a man who considered Paula White a spiritual counselor.

The fact of the matter is that, as a shepherd, a pastor has the responsibility to not only preach biblical truth but to apply that truth in the context of the lives of the congregation. After all, why teach of the “sufficiency of Scripture” if I don’t practice what I preach by offering Scripture as a guide for every-day decisions? Especially when those decisions can have a real and tangible bearing on the future of the whole congregation!

Yet, there will be those who disagree with me. They will condemn any preacher like me who dares address any subject that might overlap with an official party platform. Even the appearance of disagreeing with a politician’s actions or beliefs will be used as an opportunity to say that I’m too political.

Is it too political to preach against slavery?

Is it too political to preach the dignity of humanity as the result of being made in the image of God?

Is it too political to preach that women and men are of equal value, not only before God but in the Church?

Is it too political to preach that Jesus loves children and doesn’t want them – or widows – to starve?

Is it considered too political to preach against killing infants in the womb? Evidently.

Is it too political to preach against infidelity, lying, immorality, etc.? Depends. If it’s about Donald Trump, then it’s all good.

Is it too political to call for prayers of peace? To pray for our leaders? During the Trump administration, evidently yes. Now, if I were to be like another pastor who said, “God d**n America!”, that would be just fine.

But I digress.

What about civility? What about praying for our leaders? What about loving our enemies? What about giving our enemies food when they are hungry and something to drink when they thirst? Again, that’s all too political if you don’t support same-sex marriage, abortion, transgender scout leaders, sex education in kindergarten, and anything else that winds up falling under the liberal left’s rainbow umbrella.

But now we have elected officials and public media calling for harassment, abuse, and even harm against anyone remotely connected with the current administration. Does the Bible have anything to say about that? And, if the Bible does address these issues in clear and blunt language, isn’t it worth preaching?

Bless them that curse you, and pray for them which despitefully use you.  – Luke 6:28

I exhort therefore, that, first of all, supplications, prayers, intercessions, [and] giving of thanks, be made for all men;  For kings, and [for] all that are in authority; that we may lead a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and honesty.  For this [is] good and acceptable in the sight of God our Saviour;  Who will have all men to be saved, and to come unto the knowledge of the truth. – 1 Timothy 2:1-4

Recompense to no man evil for evil. Provide things honest in the sight of all men. If it be possible, as much as lieth in you, live peaceably with all men. Dearly beloved, avenge not yourselves, but [rather] give place unto wrath: for it is written, Vengeance [is] mine; I will repay, saith the Lord. Therefore if thine enemy hunger, feed him; if he thirst, give him drink: for in so doing thou shalt heap coals of fire on his head. Be not overcome of evil, but overcome evil with good. – Romans 12:17-21

I guess if Jesus and Paul said it, it must be too political.

But I don’t preach politics; I preach the Word.

I charge [thee] therefore before God, and the Lord Jesus Christ, who shall judge the quick and the dead at his appearing and his kingdom; Preach the word; be instant in season, out of season; reprove, rebuke, exhort with all longsuffering and doctrine. For the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrine; but after their own lusts shall they heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears; And they shall turn away [their] ears from the truth, and shall be turned unto fables. – 2 Timothy 4:1-4

That’s the real reason people get upset. I really hate it for them. I really do.

But I have a charge, and I must give an account to God, not man. So, I will preach.

Would to God we had more pastors who’d do the same.

7 Comments

Filed under America, politics, Preaching, Uncategorized

The Magnificent Fifty: Foundation of Faith (Oregon)

Salem, Oregon (Artist: Susan Cassidy Wilhoit)

Oregon Bill of Rights, Article 1, Section 2 (1857)

All men shall be secure in the Natural right, to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their consciences.


To read the introduction to and purpose of this series, CLICK HERE.

This is the final installment in the series (unfortunately, I posted them in the order I took the pictures, not in alphabetical order). I hope you’ve enjoyed them as much as I’ve enjoyed sharing them with you.

Let me know if you find putting them all under one tab at the top of the blog useful. I’d love for them to be shared, and that might make it easier.

God bless, and God bless these United States of America!

Leave a comment

Filed under America, Culture Wars, politics, The Magnificent Fifty

The Magnificent Fifty: Foundation of Faith (Wyoming)

Cheyenne, Wyoming (Artist: Susan Cassidy Wilhoit)

Constitution Preamble (1890)

We, the people of the State of Wyoming, grateful to God for our civil, political, and religious liberties establish this Constitution.


To read the introduction to and purpose of this series, CLICK HERE.

Leave a comment

Filed under America, Apologetics, Faith, politics, The Magnificent Fifty

The Magnificent Fifty: Foundation of Faith (South Dakota)

Pierre, South Dakota (Artist: Susan Cassidy Wilhoit)

South Dakota’s State Motto and Seal (1889) and Flag (1992)

Under God the People Rule

 


To read the purpose behind this series of posts, CLICK HERE to read the introduction.

I would encourage you to share these posts.

Leave a comment

Filed under America, Apologetics, Christianity, Culture Wars, God, politics, The Magnificent Fifty

The Magnificent Fifty: Foundation of Faith (Pennsylvania)

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania (Artist: Susan Cassidy Wilhoit)

Constitution Preamble (1776)

We, the people of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, grateful to Almighty God for the blessings of civil and religious liberty, and humbly invoking His guidance.


Folks, is there no such thing as irony? The men and women of the Freedom from Religion Foundation (FFRF) make bold claims about a “godless” Constitution and the godlessness of our Founding Fathers, yet the words above seem to stand in stark contrast to their claims. Again, the “wall of separation” as defined by the modern “intellects” was nowhere to be found in 1776.

Leave a comment

Filed under America, Apologetics, Faith, God, politics, The Magnificent Fifty, worship