Category Archives: Love of God

Love Is Love?


What does it mean when you say “Love Is Love”?

Let’s change the words a little and see if the same way of defining love works with other stuff.

  • Rock is Rock.
  • Lamb is Lamb.
  • Bob is Bob.
  • Cola is Cola.
  • Dirt is Dirt.
  • Poison is Poison.
  • Hate is Hate.

As you can see, the words above are not as easy to define by stating that one is what it is. To say that a rock is a rock is to say a diamond is a piece of driveway gravel. To say that dirt is dirt is to equate what my flowers are growing in with stuff people dig up to smear politicians.

Is every Bob the same as every other Bob? Is Coke really as nasty as the generic stuff? Is a stuffed lamb in a toy store the same as the living, breathing, pooping animal capable of growing wool?

If “hate is hate,” then is it equally immoral to hate murder as I could hate my neighbor?

LOVE IS LOVE tells us nothing. All it does is confuse, belittle, elevate what is not the real thing, and degrade what is priceless.

Is there no standard for what love is supposed to be? Is self-love the same as sacrificial love? Stating that “love is love” doesn’t even clarify whether or not love is a verb or a noun?

That is why the Holy Spirit inspired the Apostle John to write (1 John 4:8,16): “God is love.”

What love is supposed to be is directly related to the nature of God. God is the standard. God is the Definer.

Love without God in the equation is a scary, vague, unstable, dangerous, self-serving, undefinable, always-changing emotional term that can be used to justify anything (which can be verified by doing a Google search of “Love Is Love” memes).

Poison isn’t just poison, but love without God is a poison that blinds the heart. 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Culture Wars, General Observations, God, Love of God

Not Just a Magnificent Double Rainbow

Taken with my iPhone 11 on Tuesday, June 9, 2020 in Chattanooga, TN.

How many things are more impressive than a huge end-to-end double rainbow after a major downpour?

Can’t think of many.

But how many even know what a rainbow is? It’s not simply a beautiful phenomenon or the symbol of a social advocacy movement.

It’s a PROMISE!
Genesis 9:12-17 (NLT) 12 Then God said, “I am giving you a sign of my covenant with you and with all living creatures, for all generations to come. 13 I have placed my rainbow in the clouds. It is the sign of my covenant with you and with all the earth. 14 When I send clouds over the earth, the rainbow will appear in the clouds, 15 and I will remember my covenant with you and with all living creatures. Never again will the floodwaters destroy all life. 16 When I see the rainbow in the clouds, I will remember the eternal covenant between God and every living creature on earth.” 17 Then God said to Noah, “Yes, this rainbow is the sign of the covenant I am confirming with all the creatures on earth.”

What if it’s a double rainbow? My guess is God needed a little extra reminding today.

 

1 Comment

Filed under America, current events, grace, Love of God, nature

If We Could Only Comprehend!

This morning my prayer for you (and myself) will be the same as what the apostle Paul prayed…

I pray that he may grant you, according to the riches of his glory, to be strengthened with power in your inner being through his Spirit, and that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith. I pray that you, being rooted and firmly established in love, may be able to comprehend with all the saints what is the length and width, height and depth of God’s love, and to know Christ’s love that surpasses knowledge, so that you may be filled with all the fullness of God. – Ephesians 3:16-19 CSB

Oh, that we might comprehend the width, the length, the height, and the depth of God’s love through Jesus Christ! If we could only even slightly comprehend the vast, expansive spread before us, mercy and grace for every need; the never-ending, eternal, infinite promise of his love and care; the heights to which we are raised, far above the lowly, humble truth of our natural condition and state; and the depths of Christ’s love – humble depths to which the love of God had to reach down in order to pluck us from the pit of sin… If we could only even slightly comprehend them!

Yet, through His strength (v. 16), and being rooted and grounded in His love (v. 17), it is possible! Hallelujah! Because He “is able to do exceedingly abundantly above all that we ask or think, according to the power that works in us! (v. 20 NKJV)

This morning, and every morning, to God the Father be all glory in the church by Christ Jesus, to all generations, wherever they may be, forever and ever, “world without end” (v. 20).

And all the people said… “AMEN!!” 

2 Comments

Filed under Bible Study, Christianity, Church, Faith, God, Love of God, Preaching, worship

Something Good Worth Waiting For

I waited patiently for the LORD; and he inclined unto me, and heard my cry. – Psalm 40:1

There’s an old saying, “good things come to those who wait.” Where did it come from? Who said it first? I don’t know, although I’m sure it’s traceable. All I know is that the first verse of Psalm 40 says almost the same thing, only what comes to the one waiting is better than anything this world can offer.

Something’s Wrong

Let’s think about some things that have to be going on for this verse to make any sense. First, something is wrong. Why else would David be crying out to God? Something is wrong. Why else would he be wanting God to do something.

Last night I dealt with some serious prayer requests. One thing led to another and I brought up the question that so many ask: “If there’s a God, then why is there pain? Why do good people suffer?” Here’s another question, though: If there is no God, and still there is pain and suffering, then what’s the point? Either there is pain and suffering and people going through bad times for no reason whatsoever, or there is a great plan beyond our understanding, one being worked out by a loving God.

The pain is there, regardless. Why not believe there’s hope?

In God’s Time

The second thing to observe is the fact that God works on His own time table. David cried out, for how long we don’t know, but God’s response was not immediate.

How often to we find ourselves calling out in prayer, “Do something! Do it NOW!” In David’s case, whatever was wrong was more than he could handle on his own; he needed divine intervention. How often do search for immediate answers? How often do we question God and His timing all because we know more about what is really needed at the moment?

David waited patiently. Patience requires faith. It is impossible to please God without faith (Hebrews 11:6). Are you waiting patiently?

To Those Who Wait

To those who wait patiently on the Lord; to those who have faith that God will indeed do what is best; to those who wait God gives something that most do not realize they never truly have – His undivided attention. David waited patiently on the Lord, and He “inclined” unto him.

Picture two people sitting at a table. Lots of other people are at the table, too, just going on and on about all manner of stuff. One person tries to talk to the other, but there are so many distractions. Eventually, when the other notices how much the one wants to talk, he leans over, rests on an elbow, bends an ear, and says, “Now, what were you saying?”

God is omniscient; it’s not like He can’t hear all prayers. But within this verse we get a glimpse into the reality that there is something special, a sweet privilege that comes to those who “wait patiently on the Lord.” To reach that point of communion with the Creator of the universe, to know you have His ear: now that’s a good thing for which to wait, don’t you think?

1 Comment

Filed under Bible Study, God, Love of God, Theology

“In the Cross” – A Sermon Outline

Today is Good Friday. The following is the outline I shared this afternoon on Facebook Live. It is based on the song “In the Cross” by Fanny Crosby. The idea is to be a question: How near are we to the cross?


“In the Cross” – A Sermon

For Christ sent me not to baptize, but to preach the gospel: not with wisdom of words, lest the cross of Christ should be made of none effect. For the preaching of the cross is to them that perish foolishness; but unto us which are saved it is the power of God. – 1 Corinthians 1:17-18

1. Jesus, keep me near the cross,
There a precious fountain;
Free to all, a healing stream,
Flows from Calv’ry’s mountain.

What do you see when you are near the cross? To begin with, you’ll see BLOOD.

But with the precious blood of Christ, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot: – 1 Peter 1:19

Christianity is a “bloody religion” because it takes sin seriously and sin requires a penalty – the death penalty.

Hebrews 9:22 – And almost all things are by the law purged with blood; and without shedding of blood is no remission.

Hebrews 10:18 – Now where remission of these is, there is no more offering for sin. (It is finished! Hallelujah!)

2. Near the cross, a trembling soul, [fear, repentance, humility]
Love and mercy found me; [this is a testimony]
There the Bright and Morning Star
Shed His beams around me.  (…I am the root and the offspring of David, and the bright and morning star. – Revelation 22:16)

“Unless you see yourself standing there with the shrieking crowd, full of hostility and hatred for the holy and innocent Lamb of God, you don’t really understand the nature and depth of your sin or the necessity of the cross.”
― C.J. Mahaney

“Before we can begin to see the cross as something done for us, we have to see it as something done by us.”
― John R.W. Stott

3. Near the cross! O lamb of God,
Bring its scenes before me;
Help me walk from day to day
With its shadow o’er me.

The Scenes: Matthew 27; Mark 15; Luke 23; John 19

The sheen of the golden pendent disguises horror of the mechanism.

More than a Shadow – It Must Be Carried

Matthew 16:24 – Then said Jesus unto his disciples, If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me.

Luke 9:23 – And he said to them all, If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross daily, and follow me.

Luke 14:27 – And whosoever doth not bear his cross, and come after me, cannot be my disciple.

4. Near the cross! I’ll watch and wait,
Hoping, trusting ever;

Till I reach the golden strand,
Just beyond the river.

Looking unto Jesus the author and finisher of our faith; who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is set down at the right hand of the throne of God. – Hebrews 12:2

Refrain:
In the cross, in the cross
Be my glory ever,
Till my ransomed (raptured) soul shall find
Rest beyond the river.

But God forbid that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ…- Galatians 6:14a

And you, being dead in your sins and the uncircumcision of your flesh, hath he quickened together with him, having forgiven you all trespasses; Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross; And having spoiled principalities and powers, he made a shew of them openly, triumphing over them in it. – Colossians 2:13-15

Conclusion:

Can you see His outstretched arms? Can you see the blood flowing down? Can you see His eyes looking down? Does it affect you?

How near ARE you to the cross?

1 Comment

Filed under Christianity, Love of God, Preaching

Do You Have the Heart of the Renewed or Unrenewed?

Do you ever wonder how to tell if you have been born again, saved, or renewed by the Holy Spirit?

Well, I found the lists below in a John MacArthur study Bible a while back, and I thought I would share them with you.

Do a self-assessment (2 Cor. 13:5), if you’re concerned. If you’re NOT concerned, yet you fit more in the bottom half of the list, I’m concerned for you! It might be good for you to check out the tab “Eternal Life” at the top of this blog. Seriously!

Again, this is not original on my part, but I thought it was worth sharing. If nothing else it can shine some light on areas needing improvement.

Heart, Character of the Renewed

Prepared to seek God. 2 Chr 19:3; Ezra 7:10; Ps 10:17

Fixed on God. Ps 57:7

Joyful in God. 1 Sam 2:1

Perfect with God. Ps 101:2

Upright. Ps 97:11

Clean. Ps 73:1

Pure. Matt. 5:8

Tender. 1 Sam 24:5

Single and sincere. Acts 2:46; Heb 10:22

Honest and good. Luke 8:15

Broken, contrite. Ps. 34:18; 51:17

Obedient. Ps 119:112; Rom 6:17

Filled with the law of God. Jer. 32:40

Meditative. Ps 4:4

Circumcised. Rom 2:29

Void of fear. Ps 27:3

Desirous of God. Ps 84:2

Enlarged. Ps 119:32; 2 Cor 6:11

Faithful to God. Neh 9:8

Confident in God. Ps 112:7

Sympathizing. Jer 4:19; Lam 3:51

Prayerful. 1 Sam 1:13; Ps 27:8

Inclined to obedience. Ps 119:112

Wholly devoted to God. Ps 9:1; 119:10,69,145

Zealous. 2 Chr 17:6; Jer 20:9

Wise. Prov 10:8; 14:33; 23:15

A treasury of good. Matt 12:35

Heart, Character of the Unrenewed

Hateful to God. Prov 6:16, 18; 11:20

Full of evil. Ecc 9:3

Full of evil imaginations. Gen 6:5; 8:21; Prov 6:18

Full of evil thoughts. Jer 4:14

Fully set to do evil. Ecc 8:11

Desperately wicked. Jer 17:9

Far from God. Is 29:13; matt 15:8

Not perfect with God. I Kings 15:3; Acts 8:21; Prov 6:18

Not prepared to seek God. 2 Chron 12:14

A treasury of evil. Matt 12:35; Mark 7:21

Darkened. Rom 1:21

Prone to error. Ps 95:10

Prone to depart from God. Deut 29:18; Jer 17:5

Impenitent. Rom 2:5

Unbelieving. Heb 3:12

Blind. Eph 4:18

Uncircumcised. Lev 26:41; Acts 7:51

Of little worth.  Prov 10:20

Deceitful. Jer 17:9

Deceived. Is 44:20; James 1:26

Divided. Hos 10:2

Double. 1 Chr 12:33; Ps 12:2

Hard. Mark 10:5; Rom 2:5

Haughty. Prov 18:12; Jer 48:29

Influenced by the devil. John 13:2

Carnal. Rom 8:7

Covetous. Jer 22:17; 2 Pet 2:14

Despiteful. Ezek 25:15

Ensnaring. Eccl 7:26

Foolish. Prov 12:23; 22:15

Deceitful. Prov 17:20

Fretful against the Lord. Prov 19:3

Idolatrous. Ezek 14:3,4

Mad. Eccl 9:3

Mischievious. Ps 28:3; 140:2

Proud. Ps 101:4; Prov 6:14

Stiff. Ezek 2:4

Stony. Ezek 11:19; 36:26

Arrogant. Isa 10:12

Stubborn. Isa 46:12

Elated by sensual indulgence. Hos 13:3

Elated by prosperity. 2 Chr 26:16; Dan 5:20

Studies destruction. Prov 24:2

Often judiciously stupefied. Is 6:10; Acts 28:26,27

Often judiciously hardened. Ex 4:21; Joshua 11:20


John MacArthur Study Bible, © 1997

8 Comments

Filed under Bible Study, Christianity, Faith, Love of God, Theology

Love Is Love?

The following, posted in March of last year, holds profound meaning for a day like today.

Especially today.


Not long ago I was riding with my youngest daughter through the Nashville, TN area. We were visiting a couple of colleges that she is thinking of attending, one of them being MTSU.

Since I was the one riding, and since I wasn’t too afraid that Haley would get us killed, I felt more comfortable looking at the sights. One of the sights I saw was a little sticker placed on the back window of a vehicle in the lane next to us.

The first thing I did when I saw it was say out loud what I was thinking: “Love is love? What kind of definition is that?”

And that’s really the point of this little post (rant) of mine: What does it mean when you say “Love Is Love”?

Let’s change the words a little and see if the same way of defining love works with other stuff.

  • Rock is Rock.
  • Lamb is Lamb.
  • Bob is Bob.
  • Cola is Cola.
  • Dirt is Dirt.
  • Poison is Poison.
  • Hate is Hate.

As you can see, the words above are not as easy to define by stating that one is what it is. To say that a rock is a rock is to say a diamond is a piece of driveway gravel. To say that dirt is dirt is to equate what my flowers are growing in with stuff people dig up to smear politicians.

Is every Bob the same as every other Bob? Is Coke really as nasty as the generic stuff? Is a stuffed lamb in a toy store the same as the living, breathing, pooping animal capable of growing wool?

If “hate is hate,” then is it equally immoral to hate murder as I could hate my neighbor?

LOVE IS LOVE tells us nothing. All it does is confuse, belittle, elevate what is not the real thing, and degrade what is priceless.

Is there no standard for what love is supposed to be? Is self-love the same as sacrificial love? Stating that “love is love” doesn’t even clarify whether or not love is a verb or a noun?

That is why the Holy Spirit inspired the Apostle John to write (1 John 4:8,16): “God is love.”

What love is supposed to be is directly related to the nature of God. God is the standard. God is the Definer.

Love without God in the equation is a scary, vague, unstable, dangerous, self-serving, undefinable, always-changing emotional term that can be used to justify anything (which can be verified by doing a Google search of “Love Is Love” memes).

Poison isn’t just poison, but love without God is a poison that blinds the heart. 

 

2 Comments

Filed under Culture Wars, General Observations, God, Love of God

Valentinerie’s Love Song

Image result for happy birthday valerie gifsToday is my wife’s birthday!

She is ___ years old! (see what I did there?)

Unfortunately, I am not with her; she decided to go to Charleston this week to spend time with our granddaughter. But that doesn’t mean I can’t wish her a happy birthday via the world wide web, right?

Happy birthday, Valerie! I heart you!

Holiday Names

My wife’s name is Valerie. Is it any wonder? I mean, she was born just two days before Valentine’s Day (and, coincidentally, on the day my parents got married). Valentine > ValerieLogical.

You have to admit, Valerie sounds a LOT better than Valentinerie.

Valentinerie… Now that’s a name worth passing around at the maternity ward!

Hmmm. That makes me wonder. What other names parents could name their daughter’s around this time?

  • Valentina?
  • Chocolatta?
  • Qishentyne?
  • Vilntin (pronounced Valentine)?
  • Lubnote?

Yeah, I think “Valerie” was the best choice.

The Lubsong ♥

Anyway, I wrote Valentinerie…excuse me, Valerie…a love song several years ago (You can be the judge of how much was truly autobiographical).

When I couldn’t figure out how to film myself doing a music video, I went to work with marker, paper, Monkey, and iPhone.

Here is the chocolate-covered fruit of my labor (I said labor…I’ve really got to get down to that maternity ward!).

“Try Me”

Happy Valentine’s Day, everyone!

Just remember, the truest example of love is God’s love for us. May we love others with such extravagance (1 John 4:19-21).

4 Comments

Filed under Love of God, Monday Monkey, music

If Ever I Loved Thee, Tis Now

A Hymn Sermon

One of the greatest hymns, at least one of my favorites, is “My Jesus, I Love Thee.” A few years ago I preached a sermon based on the four verses from this song.

Below is a copy of the simple outline I took to the pulpit. I must admit, it got me a little wound up. (Can I get an “Amen!“)

“My Jesus I Love Thee”

My Jesus, I love Thee, I know Thou art mine; (Jn 21:15-17)
For Thee all the follies of sin I resign; (2 Tim. 2:19)
My gracious Redeemer, my Savior art Thou; (Ruth 2:10)
If ever I loved Thee, my Jesus, ’tis now. (The Place of Regeneration)

I love Thee because Thou hast first loved me, (1 John 4:19)
And purchased my pardon on Calvary’s tree; (1 Peter 1:18-19)
I love Thee for wearing the thorns on Thy brow; (Mt 27, Mk 15, Jn 19:2)
If ever I loved Thee, my Jesus, ’tis now. (The Place of Realization)

I’ll love Thee in life, I will love Thee in death, (Job 13:15)
And praise Thee as long as Thou lendest me breath; (Job 33:4)
And say when the death dew lies cold on my brow, (Ps. 116:15)

If ever I loved Thee, my Jesus, ’tis now. (The Place of Resignation)

In mansions of glory and endless delight, (Jn 14:2)
I’ll ever adore Thee in heaven so bright; (Rev 21:23)

I’ll sing with the glittering crown on my brow, (2 Tim 4:8)
If ever I loved Thee, my Jesus, ’tis now. (The Place of Revelation)

-William Ralph Featherstone (1864)

Regeneration. As I read the lyrics, I began to see a logical progression through the believer’s life. First, there was the love for Jesus that comes when one is born again – that moment of regeneration, when one is “saved.” The love we have for Christ is evident by our desire to repent of our sin and turn from its “follies.” Along with that, there’s the humble heart that asks, like Ruth, “Why have I found grace in thine eyes, that thou shouldest take knowledge of me?”

Realization. The second verse describes a maturing love for our Lord that, over time, gains an appreciation for what Christ actually did to save us. Our love deepens when we begin to realize all those little sins, even the pettiest, caused the sinless Son of God to have to endure unimaginable pain and humiliation, not out of obligation, but because of His love for us. His cross should have been mine, but He loved me first; therefore, I love Him.

Resignation. Thirdly, there’s that place in life when we must ultimately resign everything – our hopes, our dreams, our lives – to the One who ultimately lends us each breath. This deep, trusting love comes from a life that has witnessed the enduring faithfulness of our Savior, leading us to echo the words of Job, “Though He slay me, yet will I trust Him.”

Revelation. Then, finally, there will be the place of revelation that will send our love for Christ soaring to infinite heights. We will know as we are known. We will have no more need of faith, for faith shall become sight. We will be eternally overwhelmed by the Love of the ages, forcing us to cry out, “If ever I loved thee, my Jesus tis now!

Just thought I’d share 😉

Sermon: “My Jesus I Love Thee!”

3 Comments

Filed under Christian Maturity, Faith, God, Love of God, Preaching, salvation, worship

Do You Have After-Christmas Gifts?

“And when they were come into the house, they saw the young child with Mary his mother, and fell down, and worshiped him: and when they had opened their treasures, they presented unto him gifts; gold, and frankincense, and myrrh.” – Matthew 2:11

Late-Comers

Part of the Christmas story can be found in the book of Matthew, the first book in the New Testament. There, in chapter two, we read of several wise men, Magi, who followed the star till it rested over the place where the young Jesus was living.

But what most people fail to notice is that only the shepherds came to visit Jesus while he was still a baby in a manger. The Magi came later, once they were living “in the house” and Jesus was a “young child.” And, based on Herod’s decree that all male children 2 years old and younger should be killed (Matt. 2:16), Jesus could have been a toddler up and walking.

Simply put, generally, every manger scene protested against by atheists is not a faithful representation of the Christmas story. How ironic is that? But I digress…

The Gifts

When the Magi came to Bethlehem in search of “he that is born King of the Jews” (Matt. 2:2), they brought with them three very rare and valuable gifts: gold, frankincense, and myrrh. They were not random gifts, but ones with specific political, spiritual, and practical importance; they were meant to recognize a literal, earthly, but also heavenly King.

gold frankincense and myrrhGold was a universally recognized precious metal, symbolic of all wealth. Frankincense was a substance primarily used as incense, but also mixed with other substances to create the holy anointing oil placed on high priests and kings. Myrrh was a substance used for things ranging all the way from cosmetics and antiseptics, to perfuming the living and embalming the dead.

According to Matthew 2:11, the Magi fell down before Jesus, which would have been an appropriate response when in the presence of royalty (and these men knew the difference). But the wise men did more than fall prostrate before royalty, they “worshiped him.”  This young king was more than just “King of the Jews,” but the long-promised Messiah, and they offered their gift to the Son of God.

Are You Wise?

As long as I can remember there have been sermons preached during and before Christmas entitled, “Wise Men Still Seek Him.” The sermons focus primarily on the seeking leading up to Christmas, but rarely, if ever, on the gifts given after the celebration is over. But today is different.

Today, I am going to ask you to consider three gifts we should give, now that the birthday celebration is over.

  • Gold. Gold represented wealth. In your worship of the King, will you give Him your wealth? In reality, God owns everything, including everything He loans unto you. But with your heart, are you willing to lay everything that is most valuable to you at His feet?
  • Frankincense. Frankincense represented worship. Would you be willing to fall down before Jesus, or do you hold back some of your Frankincense in reserve? Are there idols in your life – people or things – for which you reserve a little of that anointing oil, making those things lords of your life? Would you be willing to make Jesus Lord of all? Will you worship him without reservation?
  • Myrrh. Myrrh was symbolic of the beauty of life, from beginning to end. Would you give to Jesus everything that makes you happy? Everything that brings you hope? Everything that is sweet-smelling? Everything that hides your faults and failures, disguising your true self? Would you give Jesus your life? He can do more with it than you can do on your own.

Returns

For several days after Christmas people will stand in line to return and/or exchange unwanted gifts. Many will trade what others gave them for something they want more. Others will just ask for a refund or in-store credit.

Rest assured that when you give your gifts to Jesus, he will not return them, exchange them, or re-gift them next year. But will you, once you realize what you’ve given, want to take something back?

Don’t wait for a New Year’s resolution. Now that Christmas is over, be like the Magi and leave everything at Jesus’ feet, then “depart…another way.” Once you give Jesus those three gifts, you’ll never be the same.

2 Comments

Filed under Christian Living, Christmas, God, Love of God, salvation, wisdom, worship